NYC Beam Project 2020

BEACON


Updates

People
Lewis H. Latimer
Shervone Neckles
Fellows

Fundamentals
Metalworking
Electronics
Moldmaking

Prototyping
Filament
Touch Sensor 
Proximity Sensor

Plans
Technical Drawings
Latimer’s Patents

Activities

Superhero Signal Projector 
GIF Pie
Artworks
Robots


BEACON






The New York City Beam Project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.
To find out more about how National Endowment for the Artsgrants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.


This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Generous support provided by Con Edison
Mark

Fundamentals / are the main skill-areas required to build Beacon


ELECTRONICS



Electronics are the most integral part of BEACON.  We’ll be paying homage to Latimer’s original carbon filament, that when charged with the flow of electrons created glowing light. We’ll be learning a modern set of tools for working with electricity, lighting and programming... 


Arduino / Circuits / Programming



We tested out the basics of assembling a Capacitive Touch Circuit.  
A change is detected (the finger touches a piece of copper tape) and the Arduino is told to use that change as a Switch to turn on the LED.



Later, we graduated to a more complex circuit, where a light sensor change signals to the Arduino to change a multi-color LED.


Justin testing out an array of 3-color LED objects linked to an Arduino circuit.


Arduino hooked up to the breadboard circuit, which sequences through the colors a RGB LED strip cast into a Plastic Resin shape.


Justin testing the initial connections for the RGB LED cast object.  He makes the observation that when the Red, Blue and Green colors are all connected that the visible light is White!



Johanna testing out the range of a Photoresistor - which senses the amount of ‘visible’ light - on the RGB LED cast object.



Soldering


Solder is all about fusing electrical connections.   With a soldering iron (HOT!) and special melting wire called solder, we learned how to solder (connect) electrical wires to make complete circuits.


Jae and DayDay learning how to solder.


Johanna soldering connections on an RGB LED strip.


Jae, Justin and Justin soldering together a simple LED light circuit with a switch.